Matt Bomer Still Plans To Play Gay/Bisexual Star Montgomery Clift ‘If It’s Done Right’

montgomery-clift-matt-bomerLast September the news emerged that Matt Bomer was attached to star in a biopic of legendary gay/bisexual 1950s star Montgomery Clift. However we’re heard little about the project since.

So while talking to Bomer in the set of White Collar, Xfinity LGBT decided to ask him about the project and whether we’re still likely to get to see him take on Clift.

Thankfully the film is still in the works, but it’s still waiting for all the right pieces to comes together. Bomer says, “It’s potentially on track to be made in the way that we’d like it to be made, at the home we’d like it to be made. But I’m only going to be a part of it if it’s done right. I have too much respect for Monty and Liz [Taylor, Clift's close friend] and that whole world and that whole generation of actors…we could do it tomorrow and make some salacious version of the story and that’s not what I’m interested in.”

In the late 40s and early 50s, Clift was on the path to becoming one of the biggest stars in the world. After The Heiress, Red River, A Place In The Sun, I Confess and From Here To Eternity, he was a true heart-throb with three Oscar nominations to his name. In many people’s opinion he was a talent on a par with James Dean and Marlon Brando – and all that by the age of 24.

However, Clift was also gay (or at least bisexual) at a time when homosexuality was illegal. He never really came to terms with his sexuality. He suffered from severe self-loathing throughout his adult life (as did many gay people back them) and became a severe alcoholic. In 1956, during the filming of Raintree County, he crashed his car while drunk which caused various injuries, including facial lacerations that meant he was never quite as good looking again. While he continued to work, with a prominent facial scar and alcohol quickly ageing him, his roles were limited and his days as a heart-throb were essentially over.

He died in 1966, aged only 45, from alcohol-related occlusive coronary artery disease. Acting teacher Robert Lewis famously described Clift’s death as the longest suicide in history.

It certainly a story worth telling, but as Bomer says, it needs to be done right, so that it doesn’t just become another movie about a gay guy who dies. Although Clift was famous, his story is typical of thousands of gay people at the time, whose life was destroyed by society’s attitude towards their sexuality, which not only criminalised same sex acts but also ensured they hated themselves.

It’ll also be interesting to see whether Bomer’s reference to the film being made as ‘the home we’d like it to be made’ means HBO. The pay-cable network was behind The Normal Heart, which Bomer just starred in, and with its track record for gay-themed projects such as Looking and Behind The Candelabra, it would seem a sensible home.

Matt Bomer May Play Gay/Bisexual Star Montgomery Clift In A New Film

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It appears that White Collar and Magic Mike star may be playing the legendary 1950s star Montgomery Clift in an upcoming biopic – at least according to producer Michael Din, who revealed the news on Twitter.

After a user posted the question (to Perez Hilton), ‘Since you know everything, is it true that Matt Bomer is playing Montgomery Clift in the movie Monty Clift by pier3pictures??’

Din replied, ‘@Yolanda150965 Yes, he is, altho we don’t have a schedule yet. It won’t shoot til 2014′

In the late 40s and early 50s, Clift was on the path to becoming one of the biggest stars in the world. After The Search, Red River, A Place In The Sun, I Confess and From Here To Eternity, he was a true heart-throb with three Oscar nominations to his name, and in many people’s opinion a talent on a par with James Dean and Marlon Brando – and all that by the age of 24.

However, Clift was also gay (or at least bisexual) at a time when homosexuality was illegal. He never really came to terms with his sexuality. He suffered from severe self-loathing throughout his adult life (as did many gay people back them) and became a severe alcoholic. In 1956, during the filming of Raintree County, he crashed his car while drunk, which caused various injuries, including facial lacerations that meant he was never quite as good looking again. While he continued to work, with a prominent facial scar and alcohol quickly ageing him, his roles were limited and his days as a heart-throb were essentially over.

He died in 1966, aged only 45, from alcohol-related occlusive coronary artery disease. Acting teacher Robert Lewis famously described Clift’s death as the longest suicide in history.

Bomer seems a good choice to play him, as they certainly share the fact they were/are incredibly good looking with great cheekbones. Being gay in Hollywood also gives Bomer a bit of further insight into Clift.

Montgomery Clift

Montgomery Clift

Crush Of The Day: Montgomery Clift

Montgomery CliftIn the realms of stars of Hollywood’s Golden Age, some go weak at the knees at the idea of Paul Newman, others James Dean or Marlon Brando, but for me the best of the young actors who emerged in the 1950s is Montgomery Clift. He mixed astonishing good looks with exceptional acting talent, and few people have ever been as good at looking wounded and as if they’re in need of a good hug.

One of his best films, A Place In The Sun, returns to UK cinemas today, which is a good excuse to post a gallery of some of his best pics.

In the late 40s and early 50s, Clift was on the path to becoming one of the biggest stars in the world. After The Search, Red River, A Place In The Sun, I Confess and From Here To Eternity, he was a true heart-throb with three Oscar nominations to his name, and in many people’s opinion a talent on a par with James Dean and Marlon Brando – and all that by the age of 24.

However, Clift was also gay at a time when homosexuality was illegal and he never came to terms with his sexuality. He suffered from severe self-loathing throughout his adult life (as did many gay people back them) and became a severe alcoholic. In 1956, during the filming of Raintree County, he crashed his car while drunk, which caused various injuries, including facial lacerations that meant he was never quite as good looking again. While he continued to work, with a prominent facial scar and alcohol quickly ageing him, his roles were limited and his days as a heart-throb were essentially over.

He died in 1966, aged only 45, from alcohol-related occlusive coronary artery disease. Acting teacher Robert Lewis famously described Clift’s death as the longest suicide in history.

All that’s a bit depressing, but it’s a good reminder of how much more difficult it was to be gay just a few decades ago (not that it’s always a picnic now). There’s no doubt though that as a young man, he was astonishingly good-looking, so click below to enlarge our selection of pics, and enjoy what he was like before the drink and self-loathing got to him. [Read more...]

Montgomery Clift Biographer Remembers The Classic Gay Star


Monday marked 46 years since troubled star Montgomery Clift, who was undoubtedly one of the best actors of the Golden Age of Hollywood, died of a coronary occlusion brought on by alcoholism. He was only 45.

To mark the event, his biographer, Patricia Bosworth, has released a new video in which she remember the star, and talks a little about his homosexuality. “He was, of course, gay,” she says. “He was mysterious and I think that also appealed to audiences in those days. Of course, it tormented him that he had to hide his sexuality, which he did. He was an icon to the gay community.”

Bosworth’s book, Montgomery Clift – A Biography is perhaps the most in-depth look at the actor, although the biography by Clift’s onetime love Maurice Leonard is worth a look too.

Freud (DVD)

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It’s very peculiar that despite Montgomery Clift and Susannah York starring in the film and the legendary John Huston behind the camera, Freud has never been legally available on either VHS or DVD in the UK. That’s now being addressed with this release, which gives a fresh outing for the unusual biopic.

Rather than covering the whole of Sigmund Freud’s life, the film concentrates on the years from 1885 to 1890 when he was developing his most famous theories. Against the backdrop of a medical establishment who believed mental problems either had a physiological cause or were just people pretending, Freud began to explore the idea of the unconscious and his ‘talking cure’, which sought to uncover memories the patient had suppressed and by unlocking them, cure the problems they faced (or at least that’s the overly simplified way it works in the film). [Read more...]